Otters frolicking underwater.

(via vlchemist)

yellowfur:

20 dollar commission from my livestream 

yellowfur:

20 dollar commission from my livestream 

(via space-cat-party-station)

asker

little-lorayne-deactivated20140 asked: Hey Mark, you reblogged a couple of photosets of legless geckos a little bit ago, and in one of them, I (a nature interested laywoman) could definitely tell that they were geckos based on the pointed shape of their heads. But in the other, I wouldn't have been able to tell that they were geckos and not snakes. So how DO you spot the difference between legless geckos and snakes when they're not so pronounced?

markscherz:

Super great question!

Alright so I do it based off of instinct - I have seen enough of them now that I can easily distinguish between them without second thought.

BUT if you were to try to point out the differences, they are as follows:

  • Pygopodids have external ear openings. NO snakes have these. This is a very good indicator.

http://cdn1.arkive.org/media/72/72E75277-83F0-448B-990A-44C22EFEA748/Presentation.Large/Head-of-brigalow-scaly-foot-showing-fleshy-tongue.jpg

  • All pygopodids (legless geckos) have thick tongues (vs. thin, deeply bifurcated tongues in all serpents, which are more akin to the tongues of varanid lizards).

http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/CB/CBE7419E-5E81-4116-9453-DA1587C0DC22/Presentation.Large/burtons-legless-lizard-showing-tongue.jpg

  • Pygopodids probably don’t use their tongues for sensing their environments the way snakes do. If they behave in the way geckos do, they will lick the substrate occasionally to sense chemicals, but generally will use their tongues only during eating and cleaning. Snakes, on the other hand, as I’m sure you know, flick their tongues out to sense chemicals on the air, on a regular basis when active.

File:Burtons Legless Lizard (Lialis burtonis) (8692553544).jpg

[x]

  • In the case of scaly-foots (genus Pygopus), there is a reduced appendage that helps to distinguish them from snakes:

http://museumvictoria.com.au/bioinformatics/lizards/images/lepilive1.jpg

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  • Pygopodids have continuous scalation around their midbodies. So where higher snakes (i.e. not typhlopids and their allies) usually have wide, single ventral scales down the length of their bodies, pygopodids have several ventral scales per row:

Those are the most distinct features. So I hope they help!

asker

sheep-calamity asked: draw a dragon eating ice cream for the first time?

manalon:

sket-churrs

(via axelkatten)

mightykittyzilla:

redicnomad:

Sketch for kyonomiyagami

Hey even preds have normal days c:

mightykittyzilla:

redicnomad:

Sketch for kyonomiyagami

Hey even preds have normal days c:

(via c-xxx-squared)

luce-do-the-doodles:

Sorry for reposting. I found that I draw Audino’s ear wrong…
Check my Pokemon Crossing tag for more Pokemon villagers!

luce-do-the-doodles:

Sorry for reposting. I found that I draw Audino’s ear wrong…

Check my Pokemon Crossing tag for more Pokemon villagers!

(via elementnumber46)

fuckyeahhyrule:

Cool extruded views of Ocarina of Time maps

(via coffeecollie)

frillygills:

so basically what if pyralspite was like a huge puppy to redglare
a huge, fire breathing puppy
idk im too tired ill finish this up at a later date when i dont have a migraine yeehaw

frillygills:

so basically what if pyralspite was like a huge puppy to redglare

a huge, fire breathing puppy

idk im too tired ill finish this up at a later date when i dont have a migraine yeehaw

(via mayplehaven)

lancerbuck:

bearcuts:

a ferret wearing some jeans

Oh, God. XB Long torso and stubby legs. Too damn cute.

lancerbuck:

bearcuts:

a ferret wearing some jeans

Oh, God. XB Long torso and stubby legs. Too damn cute.

(via eclipticafusion)

deevalentine:

ok archie i dont even know anymore

deevalentine:

ok archie i dont even know anymore

(via mayplehaven)